CSUN17 Preview

The 32nd CSUN Assistive Technology Conference is coming up soon—27 February to 4 March at the Manchester Grand Hyatt Hotel in downtown San Diego, California.

CSUN Assistive Technology Conference

This is the largest disability and technology conference in the world. Attending is quite an experience, so much learning, networking, sharing, and fun!

If you’re unable to attend in person, there’s always great info from the conference on the web, and the Keynote Address will be streamed live on YouTube.

The Exhibit Hall is free and open to anyone, simply register for Exhibit Hall only.

Besides the workshops and sessions, there are many events happening. Look out for Accessible Karaoke, role=drinks, Google’s party (if you’re privileged enough to get an invite), a Microsoft social, the aXe Hackathon (Saturday morning), and a Structured Negotiation book party. There is no Tweetup this year.

Web Axe author Dennis Lembree is co-presenting two sessions: Inclusive Design Fundamentals for Web and Mobile (workshop) and Creating Successful Accessibility Programs through Governance.

The Twitter hash tag is #CSUNATC17 which is a new format. Tweeps are also using #CSUNATC and #CSUN17. The conference Twitter account is @CSUNCOD.

The usual large companies will be present (and sponsoring) such as Adobe, Oracle, Microsoft and Google. Here are schedules and more info from a few sponsors:

Are you new to the CSUN conference? If so, I recommend you read these articles:

Last few years:

Section 508 Refresh!

U.S. Access Board logoHuge news! The very long awaited “Section 508 Refresh” was officially published in the U.S. Federal Register January 18, 2017. The new rules, officially known as the “Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Final Standards and Guidelines”, are also documented on the U.S. Access Board’s website.

As before, the rules pertain to “electronic and information technology developed, procured, maintained, or used by Federal agencies covered by section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.”

As anticipated, the web-based portion of the refresh adopts WCAG 2.0 AA.

The rules go into effect in 60 days from publication, which is March 20. Compliance is not required for one year—January 18, 2018.

It’s important to note that legacy content is excused. Through a “Safe Harbor” provision, content published before March 20 is not required to comply with the new rules but still must comply with the previous Section 508 requirements.

The refresh also includes “telecommunications equipment and customer premises equipment covered by Section 255 of the Communications Act of 1934.”

Further reading:

Addendum

Bad news from the Trump administration. A related update regarding ADA is put on hold. The following quote is from DOJ Disables Titles II and III Website Regulations by National Law Review. Fortunately, case law in the U.S. for web accessibility continues to be strong.

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has placed its once-planned website accessibility regulations under Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on an inactive list, putting to rest speculation about what the Trump administration may do with respect to the long-promised regulations.

Accessibility Jobs, Nov 2016

More great opportunities in the digital accessibility field (all U.S.):

For more, on Twitter follow me (@WebAxe) and @a11yJobs.

Jobs written on newspaper with magnifying glass

Assistive Technology Surveys

Digital accessibility experts are often asked about the usage of screen readers and assistive technologies. For example, one will often ask “What’s the most popular screen reader?” This is difficult (if not impossible) to determine technically, but also has privacy implications and other problems.

The following two surveys provide great data and are provided by very reputable organizations. Keep in mind though that the respondents were not controlled and the sample sizes are relatively low.

Are you aware of any other recent related surveys?

A person using a laptop computer wearing headphones and touching a braille output device.
A person using assistive technology.

Accessibility Jobs, June 2016

Some great opportunities! (All U.S.)

For the Silicon Valley/CA jobs, credit to @jennison @a11ybay @a11yjobs.