Digital Accessibility Jobs, February 2018

High Contrast Option for Color Contrast

Most of use are aware of the color contrast guideline in WCAG 2.0 AA which states:

1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: (Level AA)

This can be a big problem for websites when the color scheme uses the brand colors which do not meet the above requirement. This can be especially troublesome for medium orange and green tones.

A technique to meet this guideline is G174:

Providing a control with a sufficient contrast ratio that allows users to switch to a presentation that uses sufficient contrast

You may want (or need) to consider this technique for your website, at least temporarily. The control for this option should be in a global nav bar or settings (if available). A longer term goal is to correct your brand’s colors so that it meets the 4.5:1 color contrast requirement.

Here are some examples of websites that have a high contrast option available (the control is in the top horizontal bar in all examples).

partial screen shot of Choice Hotels website; arrows points to text increase contrast
Example of providing an increased contrast setting on a website.

Screen Reader User Survey 7 Results from WebAIM

In December 2017, results of Screen Reader User Survey #7 by WebAIM were released. The survey was conducted in October and had 1,792 valid responses. The survey had less respondents than the previous survey, but had better world-wide representation.

Highlights:

  • Primary screen reader usage: JAWS 46.6%; NVDA 31.9%; VoiceOver 11.7%.
  • CAPTCHA remains the most problematic item.
  • The second most problematic item is now “Screens or parts of screens that change unexpectedly”. This is surely due to complex designs and SPAs/JS frameworks.
  • Web accessibility basics (keyboard access, alt text, forms, headings, data tables) are still in top 10 of most problematic.
  • When asked if more accessible web sites or better assistive technology would have a bigger impact on accessibility, 85.3% responded more accessible web sites.
  • Sadly, frequent use of landmarks and regions dropped to 30.5%. WebAIM states that this may be “due to infrequent or improper usage of landmarks/regions in pages”.
  • 33.3% reported using Braille output with a screen reader.
  • 41.4% reported using an external keyboard with a mobile device and screen reader.

I highly recommend you also read WebAIM’s summary of Screen Reader User Survey.

More:

WebAIM web accessibility in mind

Web Accessibility Books

Here’s a great list of accessibility books. Feel free to submit any others in comments.

Related:

book cover: Accessibility For Everyone book cover: Inclusive Design Patterns book: A Web for Everyone

Digital Accessibility Newsletters

The web/digital industry certainly moves fast, and arguably even more so in the accessibility field. Here are some good resources to help keep you updated.

Related:

Know any others? Please leave a comment.

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