Recent Web Accessibility Lawsuits

Listed below are three recent lawsuits regarding web accessibility, and then some great related links. Legal action against inaccessible websites is a growing trend especially in the U.S. and unfortunately a needed one. It’s always been my opinion that although it’s obviously smart for companies to provide accessible websites, it’s the law that will make it happen on a wide-scale. Sad but true.

gavel - black and white illustration

Blind Woman Sues Red Roof Inns, Alleging Inaccessible Website

The plaintiff requests the court require Red Roof to retain a mutually approved consultant to perform periodic automated accessibility audits to oversee the defendant’s compliance with the ADA, create an official accessibility policy and post the information directly on its website.

Legal action against the NBA over website accessibility

The suit specifies that screen readers should be able to navigate through the NBA website as ‘screen reader software provides the primary method by which a blind person may independently use the Internet. Unless websites are designed to be read by screen reader software or other assistive technologies, blind individuals are unable to fully access websites and the information, products and services available through the sites.’

Blind Woman Sues Toys “R” Us, Alleging Violation of Federal Disabilities Act

The suit says the toy company’s website contains digital barriers which limit the ability of blind and visually impaired consumers to access the sites.

[The plaintiff] seeks a permanent injunction, directing Toys “R” Us to bring its websites into full compliance with ADA requirements.


Accessibility Jobs, November 2015

More great opportunities!

Added Nov. 10:

Upcoming Accessibility Events

Some great accessibility events coming up!

Did I miss anything? Please add in comments.

Update Sep 24: added Ottawa and Chicago events

Infinite Scrolling and Accessibility (It’s Usually Bad)

Experts say don’t do infinite scrolling, or be extremely careful in doing so. I completely agree. Infinite scrolling creates accessibility and usability problems. Below are checkpoints, issues and suggestions from a few resources.

Here’s a great list of checkpoints from the article So You Think You’ve Built a Good Infinite Scroll by Adrian Roselli (@aardrian):

  1. Can the user hit “back” and return to the exact same place?
  2. Is there paging for when the JavaScript breaks?
  3. Does the page have a footer?
  4. Can a keyboard user access all other content on the page?
  5. Can you share a URL to a specific place on the page?
  6. Can a user easily jump ahead a few “pages” to quickly get to content much further down the list?
  7. Does the memory footprint of the page dramatically increase after just a couple new “pages?”
  8. Is there a way to disable automatic infinite scrolling and lean on standard paging?
  9. Have you conducted any user tests?
  10. Are you satisfying a use case that has come from research or user request?
  11. Do you have any analytics/tracking to measure success?

In the article Infinite Scrolling: Let’s Get To The Bottom Of This, Smashing Magazine makes some great points including the following.

Fails: temptation, optimism, exhaustion, pogo-sticking, loss of control, distracting, unreachable

  • Users want immediate access to exclusive data.
  • Users want to feel in control.
  • Users often look for landmarks when scrolling.
  • Consider conventional pagination or a hybrid solution.
  • Provide interesting content without an ambiguous interface.
  • Users often expect a footer.
  • An infinite list is still a list.
  • Effects are nice to have but not a must.

In the Simply Accessible article Automatic infinite scrolling & accessibility, Derek Featherstone (@Feather) says:

  • Just don’t implement infinite scrolling.
  • Replace automatic infinite scrolling with a “Load more results…” button or link that explicitly invites the user to add more. Once they do a few times, prompt them to ask if they’d like to turn auto-loading of more results on.
  • No, really, just don’t implement infinite scrolling.

Further reading:

Accessibility Jobs, July 2015

Some great job opportunities relating to web accessibility:

As always follow me (@WebAxe) and @a11yJobs on Twitter for more!

Also, check out this LinkedIn group, The Digital Accessibility Career Exchange.