Accessible PDF (Acrobat) Files

We all know that PDF files (Adobe Acrobat) are very common in the workplace and on the web. Learn how to make them Accessible in this tenth podcast of Web Axe.

Download Web Axe Episode 10

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We know about PDF files. Our PDF converter allows you to convert PDF to Word as well as PDF to Excel so you can use and analyze without retyping.

4 comments

  1. Erik

    Thanks, I have picked up your Podcast at iTunes and like listening. I do webdev at a municipal government, and have taught myself most of what I have needed to get by. It helps to listen to people like you. Keep it going!

    We use a lot of PDFs — more and more because it’s a way for our Webmaster to get all the city employees to do more of the work of getting content online (since God forbid we look into a content management system). I will start preaching the benefits of using Word styles in the preparation phase.

    We are stuck in the table layout model, and will be for the excruciating forseeable future. What impact does this have on accessibilty?

    Thanks again and keep it up.

  2. Dennis Lembree

    hello erik, thanks for the message. About the table layout model, but i’m pretty sure that as long as the flow of the content makes sense, you should be ok. run the Reflow command to check this in Acrobat 7. Use the Word styles of course, and create distinctive headers for data tables. If you’re using Dreamweaver, then Contribute is a good option to PDF-ing everything.

  3. erik

    Thanks, Den.

    Do you have any experience with Contribute on larger sites? We have 1800 html pages — not humongous but pretty big nonetheless.

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